Easy Protein-Packed Snack: Lima Beans, Sweet Peas, and Quinoa

This is one of my favorite snacks to get in some protein and fiber. It’s especially good to make when you have leftover Quinoa. My bowl here has 1/3 cups lima beans, 2/3 cups sweet green peas, and 1/4 Quinoa with some lentils I cooked with the Quinoa.

I use frozen organic beans and peas for ease. Just mix the beans and peas together with some water to help defrost the legumes, and microwave for one minute. After heating, I drain the water and sprinkle a little garlic salt and a squeeze of lemon or lime. Boom done!

Today, I felt a little more snazzy and sauteed some chopped sweet onion in avocado oil until caramelized a bit, and then added the lima beans and peas with a little garlic salt. Heat for a minute and add the Quinoa.

This easy snack has 10g of protein and 7g of fiber.

Eating Kitchari Is Great For Post Indulgence Detox

 

Tis the season for over-indulgence. Partaking in feasts and treats is one of the fun things about the holidays, vacations, or celebrations which we all should absolutely enjoy! Food is pleasure and celebration as well as nourishment.

But, then, yeah, there are the days that follow that indulgence where you feel bloated, stuffed and are still wearing your stretchy pants. You are in need of some detoxing.

One great dish to help with post indulgence is Kitchari which is an Ayurvedic detox food. This creamy rich bowl of mung dal, rice, vegetables with warming spices will help you feel rebalanced. It’s also great to eat when it’s cold outside or if you are feeling under the weather because it’s gentle on the stomach.

One of the easiest recipes I’ve found online is Martha Stewart’s recipe for Kitchari.

I tweaked her recipe a bit to make the dish vegan. I omitted the ghee, and I did not make any of the chutney. The great thing with kitchari is that you can get creative with the vegetables. Choose what you like. Her recipe suggests cauliflower, zucchini, sweet potato, bok choy, carrots, and green beans. Have some fun with variety.

I topped my bowl with pea shoots, cilantro, avocado, radish, and this protein crunch I found at Whole Foods from Local Greens which is germinated peas, lentil, adzuki, and mung beans.

Normally, you would not add peppers to kitchari because heat is disruptive when you are trying to calm the digestive system. I put the peppers in for the photo because the designer in me can’t help myself as the red color looks nice.  If you want to add some heat to your kitchari, go for it.

I also like to squeeze lemon in kitchari to add some zest. Enjoy!

Easy Staple Meal: Maple Black Beans and Brown Jasmine Rice

 

An easy staple, everyday type meal packed with protein and fiber especially on the days when you don’t feel like cooking much is organic maple black beans with brown Jasmine rice. We have some ying/yang action going on here.

This dish is easy to make and you can add extras on top like roasted squash, green beans, chard, or collard greens. You name it! I added chopped yellow tomato with avocado and some pea shoots with red chili flakes for some heat baby!

Here’s how I usually cook my black beans.

  • Start with a 15oz can of organic black beans.
  • In a small pot on medium heat, heat one tbsp of olive oil and sauté two chopped cloves of garlic with a 1/4 chopped small onion until they are soft.
  • Throw in the black beans and a little salt to taste.
  • Add in 1 tbsp organic maple syrup to add a hint of sweet to the beans and cook everything together for about two minutes. To add some smoky flavor, add a few shakes of paprika.




Here’s how I usually cook my rice, or sometimes I’ll get pre-cooked rice at the Whole Foods hot food bar.

When I make my rice, I add in a little quinoa to add some fun texture and more protein. I like Jasmine brown rice more than regular short grain brown rice because Jasmine is a longer grain and it’s texture is less chewy than it’s shorter grain cousin.

Besides black beans, you can make this dish using pinto beans, adzuki beans, black eyed peas, or any one of your favorite legumes.

What is your favorite bean?

Send this to a friend